Creation vs consumption

Lately I’ve been thinking about how I’m spending my time.

There are periods of time every week where I find myself consuming content. That could be a TV show or movie, a book, Reddit, social media, news, tech blogs, etc.

In all of this I’m merely an open vessel absorbing bits of information. Now granted some of it is good information, and I could argue that other pieces are actually quite valuable. But on the whole a lot of it could be completely ignored, even the good stuff.

I find myself struggling against the impulse to constantly refresh and see what’s new out there, just to get a quick fix, and the desire to build and create things.

Writing articles on this blog is one perfect example of this struggle. I could spend my time reading what others are saying out there about some of the topics I love (simple living, traveling light, focus, essentialism, Apple products, etc) or I could add value to the world by sharing the things that are of interest to me.

I’d like to think that the second option will win out! I’ve caught myself reading opinion pieces on something that interests me and in the same breath realizing it’s exactly what I’ve been thinking.

So my encouragement to you is to look for the value you can add to the world, and not to just be someone who is taking what the world has to offer.

Using a new content editing experience

For the past few months I’ve been following the progress of project Gutenberg with WordPress. I’m really excited about how it’s coming together, and how this spells a new future for folks who make content. For years I’ve helped people build websites, and used WordPress for creating content. The current writing area is hardly inspiring. It doesn’t instill a feeling of being immersed with your words. I’ve rarely actually written my content in WordPress. Instead I’ve opted for creating my articles somewhere else and then pasting them in. With Gutenberg I’m looking forward to seeing this change. As the plugin matures (it’s still in Beta) I believe it will offer an opportunity to provide a richer, more immersive experience for users. Looking forward to good times ahead! Note: This was written/published using Gutenberg.

iPad Pro 10.5″ designer mini-review part 3

This is a 3 part mini-review of the new iPad Pro 10.5". Read part 1 and part 2.

After spending several days with the 10.5” iPad Pro, I decided to return it for the new 12.9” model. Here’s my reasons: Most of my working time (95%+) is spent at a desk. So for me, portability isn’t an issue.

When I use the iPad Pro it’s primarily for sketching prototypes for web interfaces, notes from meetings, etc. For these situations a larger screen is more important. It’s basically the size of a letter (or A4) piece of paper and means I don’t have to do as much zooming.

I really wanted to love the 10.5” size, and for many people I’m sure it will work well. However, as Rene Ritchie pointed out, if you want a laptop replacement – and yes, I think it’s possible that this could replace a laptop for many people – a larger screen with full sized split views makes sense.

If it’s more important to have portability, then you may want to look at the smaller size. At the end of the day I made the decision, that as a designer, that screen size was more important than anything else.

Traveling light

Often for work I need to travel stateside by plane. I’m constantly trying to whittle down what I’m carrying to see how little I can take. After several tries I’ve gotten it down to the following for a 2-5 day trip:

  • Backpack – I searched a long time for one that was small enough to carry my laptop and still had room for a few days worth of clothes, all while offering some protection.
  • MacBook Pro 13″
  • One quart sized bag of toiletries (case for glasses, contact lense solution, toothbrush, etc)
  • 1 pair of underwear for each day
  • 1 shirt for each day
  • Running shorts for wearing around the hotel room
  • Phone
  • Wallet
  • Various cords
  • Down jacket – I roll this up and stuff it in the top
  • Small water bottle for refills

I wear jeans on me, and only bring comfortable dress shoes that I can easily walk 3-5 miles in.

I roll all the clothes into packing cubes and iron the shirts when I get to the hotel.

While I can easily bring a backpack and small bag, I’ve found it so much easier to have one small backpack that I can carry anywhere I go. When I get to the hotel I pull out the packing cubes and put them away.